¿Es suficiente una vacuna o un régimen de anticuerpo contra el COVID-19?

COVID-19 VACCINE LOCATOR

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ADDRESSING YOUR CONCERNS ABOUT THE COVID-19 VACCINE

Can I get COVID-19 from the vaccine?

 

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. Learn more about the Facts About COVID-19 vaccine here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html

 

What are the benefits of getting the vaccine?

 

Getting COVID-19 may offer some natural protection, known as immunity. Current evidence suggests that reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection. However, experts don’t know for sure how long this protection lasts, and the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 far outweighs any benefits of natural immunity. COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an antibody (immune system) response without having to experience sickness.

 

COVID-19 vaccination works by teaching your immune system how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19, and this protects you from getting sick with COVID-19.

 

Are the vaccines safe?

 

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines have undergone the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

Results from these monitoring efforts are reassuring. While some people don’t have any side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine, many people will have mild side effects after COVID-19 vaccination, like pain or swelling at the injection site, a headache, chills, or fever. These reactions are normal and show the vaccine is working.

 

Are there different vaccines?

 

Currently, two vaccines are authorized and recommended to prevent COVID-19:

Vaccines in Phase 3 Clinical Trials

As of December 28, 2020, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for three COVID-19 vaccines in the United States:

  • AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

  • Janssen’s COVID-19 vaccine

  • Novavax’s COVID-19 vaccine

 

Will the vaccines work?

 

Before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determines whether to approve a vaccine or authorize a vaccine for emergency use, clinical trials are conducted to determine how well it works. This is known as effectiveness.

After the FDA approves a vaccine or authorizes a vaccine for emergency use, it continues to be studied to determine how well it works under real-world conditions. CDC and other federal partners will be assessing COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness under real-world conditions.

 

Can I have an allergic reaction?

 

The CDC recommends that people with a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications—such as food, pet, venom, environmental, or latex allergies—get vaccinated. People with a history of allergies to oral medications or a family history of severe allergic reactions may also get vaccinated.

 

The CDC has also learned of reports that some people have experienced non-severe allergic reactions within 4 hours after getting vaccinated (known as immediate allergic reactions), such as hives, swelling, and wheezing (respiratory distress).

If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, CDC recommends that you should not get either of the currently available mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. If you had an immediate allergic reaction after getting the first dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get the second dose.  Your doctor may refer you to a specialist in allergies and immunology to provide more care or advice.

 

What should I expect at my vaccine appointment?

 

You should receive a vaccination card or printout that tells you what COVID-19 vaccine you received, the date you received it, and where you received it.
You should receive a paper or electronic version of a fact sheet that tells you more about the specific COVID-19 vaccine you are being offered. Each authorized COVID-19 vaccine has its own fact sheet that contains information to help you understand the risks and benefits of receiving that specific vaccine.

 

What is the cost of getting the vaccine?

 

Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. 

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Learn more facts here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/8-things.html

Proudly created By Gines Healthcare Management Consulting, LLC

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